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  #41  
Old 02-27-2004, 05:54 PM
4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado's Avatar
4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado 4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado is offline
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I totally agree TexJ...I think we are all thru with Gembox's rants....Lets see the info...

I think maybe I have threatened the bugger...He is kinda known round here as Mr.Bodyman...And a newb has come along and threatened him somehow..

Well sorry Gembox, Like 20-30 guys ask me to do this from emails, more here on this site ask too...This is a VERY cool site...I would feel guilty letting everyone down...

I've said all along these are my experiences...And I enjoy sharing them...You cant become PPG gold certified if you dont know all this stuff...I'm a technical junkie...And live to try new things...I try to approach everything I do in this field in a technical way...Because it really is technical...

I'm hoping he still has it in him to do some rebutting in a technical way, not in a threatening way...But I'm having doubts...

I saw his one post back around the first of the year, sayin this is your one bodywork tip of the year...Cutting a little off the edge of your grinding disc...Shoot I thought, dude, give everyone more than that!! We will be all dead by the time he gives us all his pointers...Carey
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  #42  
Old 02-28-2004, 01:21 PM
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Well I see Gembox is still showin his a#$..Aint no help for that buggernutt...

Well on to prepping the primed hood.
I like to let the primer sit for at least a week or two depending on temp..Youll never have a shrinkage problem if youll give the primer time to cure..

If you have a low spot that you dont like, or spot you may have marked as needing attention with your fingertip when priming. I like to take a little 180 grit and rough up that area by hand, maybe going out 3-6inches beyond the low spot, Just rough up the primer a bit, by hand..This will give the putty something to tooth with..It wont feather or stick to unsanded primer..

Then use some two part spot putty on the low.

http://www.autopaintersupply.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store _Code=TASI&Category_Code=UCP

Either Half time or Black Ice work very well..Guide coat it after, then Hit it with your 180 on a DA to knock it down a bit then either finish it with a long or short board, or just finish it out with your random orbit long board..Using 180 on any choice.. Heres a link to some hand boards.


http://www.autopaintersupply.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=TASI&Category_ Code=3BPSE

Heres a link on the guide coat:

http://www.handsontools.com/store/sh...roduct_id=4270

It is very easy to use and very handy..No need for using the spray can stuff..You can just wipe this on, with no need to do any masking..Awesome product!

We need to remove quite a bit of the primer..I use the primer as a tool to get everything very straight..What I have found to be the best way, is dry sanding with 180 grit on a DA..

About all I have ever used is the brand Hutchins for air sanders, they are very smooth and can easilly be used/held with one hand while sanding..Thats how smooth this tool is..Heres a link to Hutchins sanders...Another tool that you cant really live without is the random orbit long board sander..They are excellent being used in prepping primmer/paint, and finishing any spot putty needed after priming

http://www.hutchinsmfg.com/products/standard.html

The generic DA's arent near as smooth so just be extra careful when your dry sanding the primer, watching that the disc edge is not digging anywhere...Keep the tool as flat as you can..The generics like to jump around alot, but can be used..

Ok once we have everything guide coated, Get a dust mask on and get your DA with 180 grit...Start sanding, you will be sanding quite a bit differently in this stage..I like to concentrate on long strokes, and pretty much stay away from any edges, they break thru easilly..When sanding and you come to a high crown or step in the sheetmetal, for instance the step in the hood, just casually bump those spots with the DA..Dont try to sand them, the edge on the disc will dig into the step..

Youll be seeing the primer powder nicely. Youll want to remove the guide coat and then I like to go beyond that some, working the DA as a hand block in long strokes, in X patterns, and many different directions..A DA used in this fashion will get a panel very straight..It is work though, youll feel it..

This is the way I prepped this car..You can see its very straight..

http://groups.msn.com/FullSizeJeepsi...nw?albumlist=2

Ok at this point blow off the car with your airgun..I like to take some grease and wax remover and coat the panel down with a rag..The grease and wax remover will stay wet for several minutes..Get on a level plane and again check the panel for straightness..If you still see something not to your liking that is very minor, mark that spot with some guide coat..I like to use 180 grit on a longboard to block the area a bit by hand..Again use the grease and wax remover to wet the panel..Remember you can only do very minor straightening here..

Get the panel clean with air gun and reguide coat the whole panel. We will be finishing out the panel by hand with either 3M yellow back 360 or 400..The 3M yellow back wetsanding paper is probably the best in my opinion, but other guys like other products..

I like to use a 3M hand pad. Link:

http://www.autopaintersupply.com/Merchant2/merchant.m vc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=TASI&Product_Code=3551&C ategory_Code=3BPSE

I like to split my sanding paper in half from the small side..

Then just wrap the paper around the hand block, starting the edge on one side of the block and folding the paper around the block..I love these blocks, they are just right..

Get a squit bottle of water, you can add some car wash soap to slicken up the water, but I never do..I will start sanding in long strokes, going in X patterns and all different directions. I also like to swirl sand also.. Keep your panel wet..I like to sand the primer till all the guide coat is gone, still staying away from edges..I like to do these with a piece of paper folded in the same fasion as I use on the hand block by hand never staying in one direction long..Make sure you go around the outside edges of the hood, there may be a rough line there from the tape used. Get every thing smooth..I like to use the water to wet the panel down at this point checking for straightness..If you still see something, you can use the wetsanding paper on a 4 or 9 inch water sanding block..You can only do minor adjustments here..

In the prep stage really be careful not letting the paper dig into the primer in dry or wet sanding stages..

I have found when I prep my primer this way, since its guide coated and sanded so much, and checked the panel for straightness so much, that you will very rarely miss a small ding..I have won many car shows with this method...It is work though so prepare yourself...I have also found you will get the vehicle very straight versus the amount of time involved..I have seen many guys just dry sand totally or wetsand totally, and either can work..If youll combine the two I feel your getting the best of both worlds..Removing alot of the primer, then getting it very smooth with the wetsanding...

After wetsanding, and the surface is dryed, youll commend yourself, as the surface will be very smooth as a babies butt..

Later, Carey

[ February 28, 2004, 07:34 PM: Message edited by: 4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado ]
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  #43  
Old 02-28-2004, 03:25 PM
roadgrime roadgrime is offline
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hey 4x4 u got a link for good bondo and glaze?

also i see u say to avoid edges.. is there a seperate step you do for the edges?
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  #44  
Old 02-28-2004, 05:16 PM
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Yea RG, guess that is not very clear, about edges. You go ahead and sand to the edges, but you dont stay on them. Stay away from the high edges/high crown body lines...Does that make any sence? The body lines will go thru easilly..But thats ok if you go thru here and there.. You want to keep the body lines sharp, so try not to round them off with the DA..Do the lines by hand, and gently round them off... Link:

http://www.autopaintersupply.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=TASI&Category_ Code=UCP

I like base coat clear coat bondo, and halftime glaze...You wont find a better combo than those two...
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  #45  
Old 03-01-2004, 12:33 AM
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Gary, You brought up a point I was curious about as well. There must be a much quicker method to use for the primer. A week or two cure period seems extremely long and it seems like rust could start developing in that period. What products do you use?

4X4, do use an inline sander for sanding the primer or the DA. I'm having trouble gettng a good picture on how to get this all smooth and as importantly, without waves and other irregularities that will show under the top coat.

[ March 01, 2004, 06:36 AM: Message edited by: TexasJ10 ]
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  #46  
Old 03-01-2004, 02:10 AM
ACERBIC ACERBIC is offline
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4x4, this post rocks. Don't even waste your time repying to Gem-o-rant. Thanks for taking the time out of your family life to write this. This comes at an excellent time for me as I am taking my truck in for a repaint very soon but I want to do most of the prep work myself to save $$.
Again, this post rocks, don't let anyone but legitimate question askers like Texas J10 to distract you from your excellent diatribe!
Thanks,
Al

[ March 01, 2004, 08:11 AM: Message edited by: ACERBIC ]
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  #47  
Old 03-01-2004, 02:13 AM
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Carey, I'm about 1/2 through what you've written so far. Printed it out and reading it in my "spare moments."

One point that may have been covered in Roadgrime's questions, but not here: What kind of time line are you writing about? Me, as a shadetree painter/bodyman, probably can't get all of this done in one session unless I take a week off or such. Where can I stop and start? You mentioned that etch needs to be sanded if it sits for any length of time. What about bare steel? May not be a problem in Colorado, California or New Mexico, but here in Massachusetts I can imagine coming back to my bare-steel project after a few days and finding it coated with a thin film of rust, even it it's parked under cover.
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  #48  
Old 03-01-2004, 02:32 AM
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Tgreese Im sure 4x4 will expand more. but with the etch and or epoxy that I am using. Both must be sanded and reapplied if allowed to sit for more than 3 days. My current plan is to shoot the etch on a friday evening and then shoot my primer either sat or sunday. but then my rig is in the garage until its done so I am not too woried about rust.
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  #49  
Old 03-01-2004, 11:39 AM
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As for Gembox, I'm not discussing priming in a production shop...That is a whole other matter...This is doing a resto on a jeep...I like to let my resto rigs sit a month after priming....Now on a production job, I would bake it for 45mins to an hour, then prep and paint away....This series of posts is about restoring a rig in your garage...If you want to discuss production shop work, that would be a whole other deal....Gembox will never tell us how he does things, he will only critisize what everybody says....I think ive finally learned that....lol But yes, Gembox, I left that out, this is a personal choice...Got me on that one!! [img]tongue.gif[/img] Maybe I should write a book, I forget to mention stuff every now and then here!!

TexJ, Hi!!...There is quicker ways, rust will not start in two weeks, remember we are using two part urethane primer here with an etch under it...It wouldnt rust underneath for a long time...The longer you let it cure up to 1 month will reduce shrinkage after, hence,nicer job...

If you have IR heatlamps you could bake it, and prep it in 45 mins and paint it...You could just let it sit a few days in the sun if youd like too...On resto work I never push them, I like to take my time ....I should have included that....Any primer can be painted within a day or two without heat...But on resto work, why push things...Look at my signature link, go see my chero, those rear quarters were etched and primed in jan.2002...Well I drive it daily, and still no rust under the primer...I will restrip it before continuing(its rock hard and not preppable), but just to let you know, with quality primers, they will holdout quite a while...

If you use Hutchins DA's you can very easilly get a panel straight, like I said it will be much harder with any other DA, but doable...On the inline sander, thats not what I was talking about but they do make them...(inline sander)

I'm talkin about a long board orbital..I use a model 4500 Hutchins DA...And a Hutchins model 3800 orbital long board...Youll have $350-400.00 tied up just in these two tools...They are the very premium in the body field...Its a bit hard for me to tell ya all how to prep, I only use the top notch tools and even a Hutchins DA sands like a block, they are super smooth....Heres a link again...When it comes to machine prepping, if your not using the top tools your finish will see it...Did ya look at the 69 Bird I just got done with a few months ago...It was totally machine prepped....Prepping is quite an art to learn, believe it or not...Youll need to be able to distinguish what is straight, what needs more sanding, and edges and body lines will throw ya if your not really paying attention...This is basically your finished job, minus a few shinny coats of topcoat....This is where the job is the most important...Its the foundation....Thanks for the question, I should have added all that!! your link below.

http://www.hutchinsmfg.com/products/standard.html

tgrease...Just do one panel at a time... Thats all I ever do in my garage here at home also...

But once you start priming, thats right, etch and prime all at once....if youd like to do a little then wait a few days and come back and do more, you can just epoxy those spots, or even just spray can prime them to keep them from rusting, just sand it off when your able to continue...

You can also use metel prepp..Its a conversion coating..its an acid, wipe on, let it sit for a few mins, then wash off with water...Turns the steel gold, and will be protected from rust till you get to it again..

Do some engine reserch there or if your patient, I will mention applying primer with a roller...There is special paint rollers you can use to apply auto primer only with...They work great for small spots or spots needing quick protection....Thats some new voodoo that they have recently came out with!!

Hope I have answered a few questions for ya all...Keep the questions coming!!!

Ive got a girl here tappin on my shoulder needin this computer for homework....Take care All....Carey

[ March 01, 2004, 06:08 PM: Message edited by: 4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado ]
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Old 03-01-2004, 11:40 AM
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Rg...Epoxy has a 3 day window....Etch has a 1 hour window...Carey
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  #51  
Old 03-01-2004, 01:05 PM
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4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado 4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado is offline
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Some links for yall:
http://www.autopaintersupply.com/Merchant2/merchant .mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=TASI&Product_Code=6358 &Category_Code=HATTOOL

http://www.autopaintersupply.com/Merchant2/merchant .mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=TASI&Product_Code=6359 &Category_Code=HATTOOL

Ive seen guys use these for wet sanding/prepping.....Very nice!!

http://www.autopaintersupply.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc? Screen=PROD&Store_Code=TASI&Product_Code=5907&Cate gory_Code=DT

Dry sander:

http://www.autopaintersupply.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc? Screen=PROD&Store_Code=TASI&Product_Code=5909&Cate gory_Code=DT

Link to rolling primer:

http://www.autobodystore.com/dent_and_roll.htm

Link to primer needed for rolling::

http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=U2202&Ca tegory_Code=

I will be geting into rolling primer later..It has some pros and cons...

Tomorrow I will do the post on fiberglass for the person that ask for it....It should just take 1 night I hope, but knowin me 2 nights!!! lol

[ March 01, 2004, 07:18 PM: Message edited by: 4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado ]
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  #52  
Old 03-01-2004, 08:40 PM
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Hey. Keep it nice. Knock the flaming off everybody.
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  #53  
Old 03-01-2004, 10:35 PM
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Very good information...

This better find its way to the tech section Adam...

BTW... you ARE writing a book... keep it coming as I am using (will be using) what you have shared during this time on my W/T Waggie...
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  #54  
Old 03-02-2004, 04:12 AM
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4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado 4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado is offline
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Thanks Dome!!, I needed that!!

RB your doing a really nice job on the flairs! Great idea moving the axle back to keep from having to slit the flair...Its gonna look GREAT!!

I'd like to toss out a few words on rolling primer before we go to prepping glass..

As usual this primer rolling idea is another european innovation. The europeans have created every major innovation in painting in the last 25 years...About every process we use now has been based on european ideas...I admire them!

In a production shop, most jobs are small to medium... Few completes. The term we use is spot work..The paint depts get backed up pretty badly every now and then...It may take a bodyman 1 hour to fix a small dent, then he sends it to the paint dept...It would be very rare to do any kind of paint work in 1 hour...Minimum job would be 3-4 hrs...So the cars will back up in the paint process...Sometimes for a week or more!

Its not uncommon for a car to sit 3-4 days waiting on paint...In this time any bare metal may get some corrosion from the air...You probably wont see it, but its there, especially in the east...So they have came out with this primer rolling idea...That way even a prepper or manager could very easilly get that job covered up, untill the painter can get to it...This idea was intro'd in '98/'99....It is growing like crazy right now...Many shops are starting to do this....

Its got some pros and cons....Its only good for small spots...It would be hard to roll a whole panel, without having some rough spots...

If youll check out the link, youll see that it is applied simialar to spraying, with each coat going past the previous coat...

On that link there is a pic of finished bondo on a hood(pic says ready for primer)...That is about as much metal you would want showing and still not use an etch...If you are rolling primer. I would get some spray can etch and give it a coat before rolling, if your bare metal was any larger than that....

Rolling Primer can work Very Well for spot jobs...The primer needs sanded anyway, so if its a little rough, it wouldnt matter...If you think about it, this is a really wonderful time saving idea....It is starting a very big wave, and will be very mainstream shortly....Heres the link again..I have read quite a few articles on primer rolling...if anyone finds one, could you please post the link, so we can all read it...Thanks....Link below:

http://www.autobodystore.com/dent_and_roll.htm

Carey

[ March 02, 2004, 10:19 AM: Message edited by: 4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado ]
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Old 03-02-2004, 05:08 AM
roadgrime roadgrime is offline
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here is one i found last night
and contains a video showing the application
http://www.i-car.com/html_pages/abou...02/020402.html
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Old 03-02-2004, 05:26 AM
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Ok lets do some fiberglass prepping!! This is for Mudder Trucker, who ask for it!

Fiberglass use to be pretty sub par, but in the last 10 or so years, fiberglass has come miles higher in quality..

Lets say we get one of those fiberglass hoods with a scoop, for our FSJ..

When you get the piece, inspect it well. It may have some low/high spots, also may have some rough edges...MAKE SURE you do a trial fit..Now would be the time to fix it, not after its painted!

Most production glass will come with a generous coat of gelcoat, its pretty shinny, so it shows highs and lows pretty easy...

I like to get some good carwash soap and soak the panel down well, youll see highs/lows better this way. By washing it, it will get any grease or mold release off. Rinse with HOT water if you can..Blow or let it air dry..

Heres an important WARNING! Fiberglass has a funny abillity to hold a huge amount of static electricity...As your prepping it you are charging the glass. It will shock the heck out of ya!!..Many times you will feel the hairs on your arm being pulled by the static when working on it...I have seen, plus myself have had some interesting times with glass...I like to use wax and grease remover as a final stage before paint...This stuff is very flammable..I for one, and have also seen it to, have applied the grease/wax remover, then caused a spark and lit the whole panel on fire...I've done this once, seen it twice, so its not that uncommon...

There is a nifty trick that will totally solve this problem...I use PPG DX103 plastic cleaner, its made of alcohol mostly...

Heres what you need to do::Get some denatured or any kind of alcohol works(tried em all). Pour some in a spray gun...Then just mist coat the glass panel with it, you dont need to soak it, just mist it....It will remove ALL static cling instantly!!! It works GREAT!! Please do this before using any kind of flammable material on glass(that includes paint).

If you see any highs, mark them, get a orbital long board, mudd hog, hand board, or inline long board with 80 grit on it...You can remove any small high spot this way. Most highs in production glass are small and can be removed generally, without going thru the gelcoat..

If you have a low spot. Hit that spot with some 80 grit on a DA just to roughen the low, go beyond the low by like 6 inches, so your putty can feather into it. Dont break thru the gelcoat if possible..

I like to use the two part putties, like Half Time by USC, or poly glaze by Evercoat..These work great on gelcoat. Only apply the putty up to 1/8th inch thick, any thicker use bondo...

Smooth/blend/level your areas with 80 grit...

If you see any chips or rough edges, you can also use the putty to fill any imperfections..

Go ahead and DA the rest in anything from 80 grit to 180 grit depending on how much primer you think youll need...If its a fairly rough piece, that may need some minor blocking, prep it with 80 grit, then apply 3-4 coats of primer..If its a fairly nice piece, that may only need a few coats of primer, do your prep work with 180...

You wont need an etch at all. That would include epoxy...Most primers are spec'd to be able to use on fiberglass...Check the howto sheet or check with your paint store to make sure the primer your using will work on glass..

You may do the similiar priming stages as we done on the hood in previous posts. Prime the body work first and fill any minor lows with primer...You may want to spray the whole piece then check for any lows also...That would probably be your best bet...Spary the entire panel...Check for lows, spray the low spot/s with a couple more coats, then finish priming the panel...

There is some glass out there that is so nice, that it wont need any body work...If thats what you have, then guide coat it, and DA it with 240 if you will be using sealer...If not using sealer, which I wouldnt suggest, prep it with 320...Then after dry sanding, use 360/400 wetsanding with a soft block like we used before on the steel hood...Do high crowns, or edges by hand, without a block...You can also use the two part putty to fill any pinholes any minor imperfections when doing the prep work..Just go ahead and finish those areas in the same manner as previous, 240-320 dry, 360-400 wet...

You could just wetsand it with 360 also, not doing any dry sanding...Any of these can work...

After priming, let it dry, flip the panel over and get it coated with something. I like rubberized undercoat, it makes the glass underneath look a little better, but it wont be shinny...If you'd like it shiny, then get some red scotch brite, and scuff the underneath decently, doesnt have to be perfectly sanded, paint will stick well..I like to use epoxy as a sealer, then paint over that...

Mask any painted or coated areas before painting the topside...

Youll see that gelcoat is a pretty hard substance and will require some work to sand it..

I have only discussed fiberglass prepping here, not fiberglass repair...

Any further questions, please post them...

Till Later, Carey
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80 Cherokee S W/T 360/727/208 Daily Driver to Work Everyday driver. Really nice original Interior. My own Cool black paint job, with an AMC theme. Custom manual rear window. Painted Razor grille. 4 inch BJ's lift with Rancho shocks, custom fabbed bumpers, steel Levi rally wheels with 32 BFG at's. TFI upgrade, '98 S10 Blazer power steering box.
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  #57  
Old 03-02-2004, 05:38 AM
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4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado 4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado is offline
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Thanks RG EXCELLENT link....Thanks again!! Carey

[ March 02, 2004, 11:48 AM: Message edited by: 4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado ]
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  #58  
Old 03-02-2004, 08:37 AM
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4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado 4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado is offline
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Ok, On to repairing a hood and saving/reusing the old paint....On the first hood, we stripped it and started over building our own foundation...On this one we will be leaving the old paint intact, and using most of it for a base for the new job...

Our hood is off a '90 waggy. It has some major chipping in front, so we will strip that part only...It has four golfball size hail dings that we will heat out with a torch...It also has a couple small waves that will require some blending/leveling. The old clear is still in good shape, it does have about 10 rock chips further back on the hood. So since the old paint is still decent and it only has some minor chips further back on the hood we will just use the old paint as the base for the new..

If we're carefull we can even leave the hood blanket intact, so lets leave it on this one..

First thing we're doing is getting that hood straight...Lets heat out those hail dents!

This is a bit old school, they dont teach these ideas much anymore...Yes its a bit vuudooish, but us guys in Colorado see so much big hail, we've had to learn it..

Ok we'll need a torch set up. Most setup's come with three brazing tips. I dont know the number or spec on the tip, but we use the smallest tip that comes in a standard torch set up...

We will also need a metel file: link:

http://www.eastwoodco.com/itemdy00.a...I1.x=32&I1.y=9

We'll also need a file holder, link:

http://www.eastwoodco.com/itemdy00.a...1.x=82&I1.y=59

I've seen guys try to use those pocket torch tools, but I dont like em personally, they heat things slowly, but for very tiny dents they work ok too..I like a big torch..

We'll need a 5 gallon bucket with water and a wash mit..

Thats all we need. Torch, metal file, bucket of water...

Ok fire up the torch, add lots of oxygen till you begein seeing a white flame appear. Adjust torch till you have a quiet flame tip 8-10 inches long...The flame should be bright white and not making the woosh noise..It should be a quiet flame..

What you have created here is a very cool flame...You need cool as possible here...

Go ahead and lay your metal file on the hood off to the side, we will be needing it quickly..Have it real handy!

Keep your bucket of water next to you, we'll be needing it quickly also..

Ok, take your torch, and start in a circular motion on the very outside of the dent, do not put the flame into the paint. Keep a close eye, youll see the dent start to rise...now quickly work the flame in a circular motion towards the center...Pull the torch higher as you work into the center...It kinda gives the feeling of actually pulling the dent, but using a torch...lol.. Yes its a bit vuudooish...lol..

Youll see the dent totally reverse itself in front of your eyes, from being downward into the same amount upward...It will form a small mountain...Sometimes the top of that mountain will still have a crater in it from the very point of the hail stone that will not want to come further out....Its ok the metal file will fix it..

At this point get the torch away and make 2-3 passes in the very top of the high/mountain you have created...The metal file will scrape the paint right to metal in that spot quickly...This opens the area up so we can do a super quick cool off/quench with the water...We want to quench what was the deepest point of the dent first, the metal file opens the spot up to bare metal so we can acheive that...So after making 2-3 metal file passes, quickly quench the area with water...You'll here it quench...

If when your first heating the dent, and it continues to go downwards..Then your torch wont work...This is caused by a high strength area...You can only heat out hail dents in areas that the panel is weak..

This is what is called the stretch/shrink method...We are stretching the metal outwards to remove the dent....Then doing a very quick quench/shrink, back down to flat...Like I said 9 times out of 10 this works great...Rarely warps the panel...Practice makes perfect on this one...Try a junk hood first....Its not hard to learn..Once you've done it a few times it will come to ya...On your practice hood, pay attention to not making too much heat with the torch, you can warp a hood this way...Youll need to learn to be precise with the flame...The metal reacts very quickly to the flame so be ready!!

This works best away from the edges or sides of the hood...It may also not work well around high crown body lines, or anywhere the hood would be strongest..(edges or body lines) This does work very well in the weak portions, which is about 90% of the hood...

Soak the area cool again...With your hand, you'll be able to feel if the spot is now straight...9 times out of ten, thats all the body work that is needed, other than feathering the area out...Finish the other dents...

If you still have a slight low go ahead and get a die grinder with 36 grit and remove the paint in about a two/three inch area, and feather the rest out with 80 grit on a DA to about an 6-8 inch area, keep the repair small, the smaller the better...

Mix up some USC brand Black Ice..Apply it to the low area, blending it into the featherd paint covering all the 80 grit scratches...Let it harden, and knock down the putty with a DA with 80 grit, when you have the swipe marks removed from applling the putty, get a 4-6 inch block and finish the area out with 80 grit by hand...Blend the putty right into the paint...Thats what the product is designed for...

Be sure to feel the panel alot, checking for straightness...

On the wave, Just go ahead and roughen the paint with 80 grit, remove the paint in the lowest spot..

If the wave is minor, or up to 1/8 inch deep, just go ahead and apply the Black Ice over the area and blend the putty into the old paint..Again, thats what this product is designed for, blending into paint...Block the area with a long board, with 80 grit..

While filling any lows, go ahead and fill any rock chips you have further back on the hood that you werent planning on stripping...The putty will fill the chip, therefore, you wont need to feather the chip area out, keeping the panel straighter, by not having to feather...These spots will be very small, about as small as an eraser when the putty is appllied...We will dicuss sanding those areas later...For now, just leave the putty alone on the chip..

Thats about all there is to the bodywork...

Get some 80 grit on a DA and strip the front edge going back say 6 inches on the front of the hood...Go all the way to metal...Now get some 180 grit on the DA and feather out the break from paint to steel that you have created...Once feathered, you pretty much done...

Go back and double check that you have filled all the chips with putty...

There is two ways we can prime this. We can prime the whole hood, or just do the few spots we have made and leave the good paint till we prep the whole hood...I'll explain either way...Later...Carey

[ March 04, 2004, 03:29 PM: Message edited by: 4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado ]
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80 Cherokee S W/T 360/727/208 Daily Driver to Work Everyday driver. Really nice original Interior. My own Cool black paint job, with an AMC theme. Custom manual rear window. Painted Razor grille. 4 inch BJ's lift with Rancho shocks, custom fabbed bumpers, steel Levi rally wheels with 32 BFG at's. TFI upgrade, '98 S10 Blazer power steering box.
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  #59  
Old 03-02-2004, 12:10 PM
roadgrime roadgrime is offline
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Join Date: Apr 17, 2003
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hey 4x4 you have another name for a flat dolly? i tried searching at handsontools.com butcouldnt find one i see like toe dolly etc.

on the upside i found two shrinking hammers since my cheap @ss harbor freight set didnt come with one. I borrow a buddies hammers and I can tell the difference in a good hammer vs my 20.00 special but its what i got so i use them and have had decent luck with alot of patience.

links to the two hammers

http://www.handsontools.com/store/sh...uct_id=2066718
http://www.handsontools.com/store/sh...uct_id=2066492
they dont show up by browsing the hammers and dollys you have to search for shrinking hammers
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  #60  
Old 03-03-2004, 09:33 AM
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4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado 4x4n In A Cherokee In Colorado is offline
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Hi RG, My wording was wrong..The toe dolly would be the closest thing to a flat dolly..I also use a piece of 1 inch steel plate, cut into a 2x4 inch piece...Works nice also...I also have the toe dolly in my Mac set...Those hammers would be fine..A toe dolly is flat on one side, so that would do ya fine!!
Try Eastwoods, they have some decent tools..I'm going to take the night off tonight...Long day lol...I'll get some more info up soon...Carey
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80 Cherokee S W/T 360/727/208 Daily Driver to Work Everyday driver. Really nice original Interior. My own Cool black paint job, with an AMC theme. Custom manual rear window. Painted Razor grille. 4 inch BJ's lift with Rancho shocks, custom fabbed bumpers, steel Levi rally wheels with 32 BFG at's. TFI upgrade, '98 S10 Blazer power steering box.
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