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-   Diesel Swaps (http://www.ifsja.org/forums/vb/forumdisplay.php?f=95)
-   -   Swapping '72 body onto '81 diesel-powered chassis (http://www.ifsja.org/forums/vb/showthread.php?t=131069)

Resbum 04-08-2012 07:14 PM

Very cool. Glad to see it worked out for you.

Resbum

rocklaurence 04-09-2012 07:00 AM

Is the new Rad' a Diesel unit and what was your reasoning for going so big?

budojeepr 04-09-2012 07:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rocklaurence
Is the new Rad' a Diesel unit and what was your reasoning for going so big?

It's just a bigger BeCool unit. The original diesel radiator was, like, 54" wide. I found that the smaller radiator was marginal in the San Joaquin Valley heat. When I start running A/C and/or towing I know I'll be happy with more cooling capacity. I'm just hoping this radiator is big enough.

Remember: go big or go home. :p

[Edit]it's not BeCool, it's Flex-a-Lite. We regret the oversight and apologize for any inconvenience we may have caused.[/Edit]

rocklaurence 04-09-2012 01:40 PM

Is it the two rows with 1" tubes and 21/4" thick? I'm venturing into a diesel conversion on my J10 and any advice is appreciated.

Resbum 04-10-2012 06:35 AM

Hi rocklaurence, you've probably already read it, but this recent thread had a pretty good mini-discussion on radiators in diesel conversions.

http://www.ifsja.org/forums/vb/showthread.php?t=153414

Resbum

rocklaurence 04-10-2012 03:19 PM

Yep, I had read some of that post (thanks) and to bad rad' manufactures don't rate the units in BTU's. IK, it all depends on airflow, humidity etc but it would be nice.

budojeepr 04-15-2012 10:51 PM

Tailgate saga continues
 
I put the tailgate back on today...whew. While it's not the hardest thing I've done (alone) on a Jeep, it comes close.

I got the inside surface nicely painted with bedliner last week, and went and got nice shiny new hardware to mount the motor today. Got home, found out two of the screws I'd bought weren't threaded all the way up, so I had to drill out two of the aluminum standoffs. Then I found out the new button heads were slightly higher than the old phillips-head button heads, so I couldn't use the flat washers without the heads hitting the window gear. Then I found out the two offending screws (see above) were a skosh too long, so I had to cut about 1/4" off. (Turns out some non-detail-oriented Ace Hardware employee or customer had put the wrong screws in the bin, then some non-detail-oriented customer [me] grabbed them).

Got Miller Luck's beautiful lift pins installed and put the motor in. Dropped one of the aluminum standoffs down into the bowels of the tailgate. Of course the magnet won't pick it up, so I had to remove the motor, then stand the tailgate up on its side and shake it 'til the standoff dropped to the floor. Then back in...more carefully this time.

Put the spring rods (torsion bars) in the bottom of the door, cleverly held in place with a small piece of duct tape. Picked up the tailgate (wearing mechanic's gloves of course), slid one rod end (driver side) into the hole in the body just above the hinge. So far so good.

Of course now I can't get the duct tape off because of the gloves...off comes one glove, off comes the duct tape. Tilt the tailgate up to put the other torsion rod end in - and out comes the driver side rod, and BANG down goes the tailgate to the floor. :banghead:

OK, this time I've learned something...but first more duct tape. Up we go, driver side rod end in - woops hinges go INSIDE - this time I thread a bolt in to the hinge to hold things together. Wish my arms were two inches longer...duct tape off...now the passenger side hinge is in the way. Lift the tailgate up far enough to put the hinge on the outside, amazingly get the second torsion rod end in its hole, then struggle the hinge back to the inside. Ha! I win!

The rest was downhill...just getting things aligned enough to close the tailgate. Final adjustments will wait 'til weather strip and window are in.

I'd had great ambitions to accomplish more, but after this experience I was beat. About 10 "cleans" with a Waggy tailgate is a good workout.

Time to grill some steaks and have a margarita.

budojeepr 04-21-2012 06:31 PM

Off to paint shop
 
There she is, in all her naked glory...don't get too excited by the choice of words fellas...:D





I did some masking at the shop today. We're scheduled to shoot primer tomorrow! :thumbsup:

lobie 04-21-2012 08:13 PM

Congrats.
Time to hide all that good work.

Resbum 04-21-2012 10:45 PM

Cool beans.:thumbsup:

the original Honcho 04-22-2012 07:06 PM

Okay, this is my first time seeing this post. I want a cummins!

Seems you are doing this swap because the later model with the cummins swap will not meet CA emissions? now im all about old style, i would take an equal condition '72 over an '81 any day. I cant pretend i read every single post on every single page or that i understand CA emissions laws, but i am left with one question: why wouldnt you just switch dashes with vins? seems way easier....

budojeepr 04-22-2012 10:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the original Honcho
Okay, this is my first time seeing this post. I want a cummins!

Seems you are doing this swap because the later model with the cummins swap will not meet CA emissions? now im all about old style, i would take an equal condition '72 over an '81 any day. I cant pretend i read every single post on every single page or that i understand CA emissions laws, but i am left with one question: why wouldnt you just switch dashes with vins? seems way easier....

Ahem. First, it's a GM 6.5L TD.

Second, my VIN isn't on the dash...and I never do things the easy practical way. It seems I lean more to the flail 'n bleed side of life. Now you've gone and given me that "went on sale the day after I bought it" feeling. Thanxalot.

:p

Well, today we cleaned it off good and shot primer. It was a good learning experience for me. Painting a vehicle isn't particularly hard; it's just REALLY hard to do it well.

Also, one gallon of paint will not give you two coats. I have to go get another quart of primer. I think we'll have enough base and top coat paint, though.

I can honestly say now the Jeep is once again one color. And we're scheduled to resume work next Sunday.

Oh yeah, I also modified the doors so they'll accept the '81 cable-operated mirrors. A great step forward from the nasty old huge things that were on there before.

Maryland Rick 05-07-2012 05:38 AM

OK....so this is an 81 Waggy frame??

Thanks...Rick

budojeepr 05-07-2012 07:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maryland Rick
OK....so this is an 81 Waggy frame??

Thanks...Rick

Sincerely, thanks for reading...

Smart-aleckly, chassis = frame + junk.

:)

Like many of these, '81 frame, '97(?) engine, '84 transmission...

budojeepr 05-13-2012 01:58 PM

All one color at least
 
I've been wet-sanding, almost ready for primer touch-up and basecoat:




budojeepr 06-03-2012 06:31 PM

Almost ready for color, and hood vented
 
The Jeep is almost ready for final paint (no pics as yet). We've done two coats of primer with wet-sanding in between coats and after. So I guess this makes it three times I've sanded the entire vehicle. :rolleyes:

The plan is to do all the painting and masking next Sunday (June 10 2012, for posterity's sake).

Per this thread, pics of the hood venting job...

Here's the expanded metal, with a scale for ... scale.


My "test hood", before mods:


Piece of expanded metal lying on the hood for marking the cutout. Note: the second time around I made a template out of cardboard (recommended!).


I started the cutout 8 inches forward of the rear of the hood to clear the inner portion of the hood. I put the bottom of the cutout 5/16" up from the fillet of the bend to center the cutout in the section. Of course this depends on how tall you make your cutout.

Welded and ground smooth:


Now, some things learned by doing a "test" job:
1. Make a template for the cutout. That way you'll get a smoother more symmetrical (between sides) cutout.
2. Tack the expanded metal onto the hood, then use JB Weld or some other industrial epoxy product to hold it on. It's not a structural member! JB Weld is good because you can use it to fill cracks, and it's grindable/sandable.
3. It's easier to grind the expanded metal smooth before you weld it onto the hood!

Here's the final product:








A view I hope to see soon:

Resbum 06-03-2012 07:19 PM

Cool mod.

budojeepr 06-11-2012 09:59 PM

Teaser alert
 
:D

Crappy cell-phone pic...no clear coat in this photo (we finished the clear too late, too dark for pictures).
Picture removed...see next post.

budojeepr 06-17-2012 04:32 PM

Well, I thought we'd get the Jeep hauled back to my place, but as you might know, when working with and depending on someone else, schedules conflict. We'll git 'er done soon, but today I just spent cleaning up the shop and getting the small pieces back home. Last night instead of counting sheep to fall asleep (who does that anyway?) I thought step-by-step the process of rewiring Cracker. Didn't make it past the taillights, where I started. :D

Note: the green really is darker than it looks in the pictures. I love the color in person, but not so much the pictures. Anyway...

Pics:

















I still have to wet-sand, cut, and buff the glossy (green) areas. I'm not looking forward to sanding this thing a fourth and maybe even a fifth time!

rwjohnstone 06-18-2012 08:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by budojeepr
I thought step-by-step the process of rewiring Cracker. Didn't make it past the taillights, where I started. :D


This inspired me to post the start of my electrical layout in my thread :thumbsup:

Thats going to be one sharp looking fsj btw:fsj:


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