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View Full Version : Does it matter if i installed my shocks upside down?


gmarblestone
05-01-2007, 12:53 PM
so yeah... i am new and i think i installed my shocks upside down after my 4 inch lift.

the skinny part i assume now should be UP and not down. But, does it really matter??? Should i spend the time to correct this?

Thanks,

Grant

Heavy_Metal_Thunder_81
05-01-2007, 01:20 PM
I dont think it matters. I put the skinny part down on mine.

mikefirpo
05-01-2007, 02:23 PM
i'm sure water and mud could collect inside an upside down shock

Don S
05-01-2007, 03:13 PM
..

... Most shocks are designed to operate with the cylinder down and the rod up. Mounting the cylinder up aides drivability buy keeping the main weight of the shock connected to the body with less weight on the axles. Many shocks have the valves set at 60 - 40 to help keep the wheels down on the road when driving over dips… I.e. lower spots in the road..

Have a good one while you can still laugh about it.. Don S..
There was a time when some people got rich buy providing a better product at a lower price.

JeepinPete
05-01-2007, 03:14 PM
It depends on the shock. Some can and some can't. Post up what you got, or get in touch with the manufacturer.

gmarblestone
05-01-2007, 03:15 PM
So you are saying most likely its ok right?
Here is the link to them -->Superlift shocks (http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=8071052224)


..

... Most shocks are designed to operate with the cylinder up and the rod down. This also aides drivability buy keeping the main weight of the shock connected to the body with less weight on the axles. Many shocks have the valves set at 60 - 40 to help keep the wheels down on the road when driving over dips… I.e. lower spots in the road..

Have a good one while you can still laugh about it.. Don S..
There was a time when some people got rich buy providing a better product at a lower price.

BRUTUS
05-01-2007, 03:52 PM
The way I think about it is this... the shock is designed to control compression and extension of the springs. Either way it is installed, compression is compression and extension is extension. I wouldn't worry to much about getting water/mud inside the shock if it is rod up.... They have good seals and they are charged with high pressure gasses... that would quickly escape if there was enough of a hole to let water/mud in.

Ralph Rogers
05-01-2007, 04:06 PM
Like it was said, see the manufacturer. Now days shocks use different valving for compression and rebound. Mounting them upside down changes the way they behave, unless they were made that way for unsprung wieght differences. Like we worry about that.
Ralph

Don S
05-01-2007, 05:15 PM
..

... I’m glad I didn’t mount my ’gas magnum’ shocks upside-down. The 200 pound gas pressure lifted the Wagoneer a half inch. I sure didn’t want a low rider! :D

Have a good one while you can still laugh about it.. Don S..
If something I’ve posted on the Internet offends you please ignore it.
If you don’t know how to ignore something on the Internet e-mail me … and I’ll demonstrate.

Greenfire
05-01-2007, 05:19 PM
I would see what the manufacturer has to say. My understanding is that the rod end should be up on our rigs. I recently had shocks up side down and the ride was horrible, to the point where I ruined the shocks. When I got the ranchos the correct install was with the rod end up and the ride was dramatically better.

Billy Bob
05-01-2007, 05:43 PM
If I am not mistaken, dual stage shocks can be mounted in either direction

BRUTUS
05-01-2007, 06:21 PM
I still don't see how there is a difference... what am I missing here?

compression with the rod end up is the same as compression with the rod end down because FUNDAMENTALLY they are both compression of the shock. Same thing for extension.

The only thing that COULD make a difference is the weight of the shock body which in comparison to the weight of the FSJ is null. Or is there some gravitational difference on the gas that makes the difference?

Don, it would have raised your waggy either way because it overpowered the springs anyways.

Stuka
05-01-2007, 06:27 PM
It does not matter with gas charged shocks, it only matters with oil charged shocks. With oil charged the oil will go down, and this can change the valving of the shock if its upside down.

BRUTUS
05-01-2007, 06:29 PM
It does not matter with gas charged shocks, it only matters with oil charged shocks. With oil charged the oil will go down, and this can change the valving of the shock if its upside down.

That makes sense.... Thanks.

Crazy_Jeepman
05-01-2007, 06:57 PM
Go with the manufacturers instructions. Some shocks are designed to run either way and others are not. I called on mine after we had a thread similar to this one. I have Gas Shocks............They are designed to run body down, not up.


Quote:
Dual Shocks?


One piece of advice… don’t run dual shocks just because they look cool, OK? However, if you get frequent heat-induced shock fade and don’t have the budget for reservoir or bypass shock absorbers, you may benefit from running a dual or triple shock setup. However, this doesn’t mean that you just slap another set (or two) of shocks in addition to your existing ones. You should get a set of more lightly valved shock absorbers to replace the ones you have now. Do the homework and figure out how much absorbing your shocks need to do before you add some more, that is unless you don’t like the fillings in your teeth.


Upside down?

Unless your shocks are specifically designed to be mounted upside down or designed to be mounted in either direction, please follow the rule stated above for dual shocks. As a rule, dual tube shocks should never be mounted upside down. Some people say that monotube or gas pressurize shocks can be mounted upside down, however in time they will develop and extra inch or more of piston travel that has little to no dampening effect whatsoever. Ultimately: don’t mount shocks upside down just because it looks cool. Sometimes a shock must be mounted upside down due to space limitations, or to protect the shock body, if this is the case, make sure you use a shock designed to be mounted upside down.

ne715
05-06-2007, 08:15 PM
The others are correct, it may make a difference if the shocks are installed upside down. Depending on if they were intended to be installed that way. Shocks are filled with oil, the oil must run through the valving in both the compression and extension stroke. If a shock is not "full of oil" it will cavitate if ran upside down and you will have not control forces of the oil moving through the valving. Some shocks that can be ran upside down are Rancho 5000 series, some of the Ranho 9000 series, some units sold by AFCO (race car shocks). Check with the manufacture or you could end up with a shock that is doing nothing but blowing air through the valving and is not damping (it's intended porpose).